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Author Topic: Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test Fact Sheet  (Read 1363 times)
James Williams
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« on: October 06, 2011, 07:52:58 AM »

A very informative read from the National Cancer Institute...a link that may prove to be very valuable to some clients...

http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Detection/PSA
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"The message blazoned across the heavens at the moment of birth is not meant to emphasize fate, but to arouse man's will to escape from his universal thralldom. What he has done he can undo. None other than himself was the instigator of the causes of whatever effects are now prevalent in his life."
Noel Tyl
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« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2011, 08:08:43 AM »

.....Thank you for the heads-up to this very comprehensive and informative article.

We know that Pluto is an indicator of the Prostate gland.  And we know about the "critical illness" link with the 12th House [please see much study of this in Tyl- Astrological Timing of Critical Illness.

We also see in practise that more and more younger men (well below the medical field's benchmark "50 years of age") are developing prostate problems.  --I know that this dip into the population born in the early 1970s is hinged upon the Pluto position then in early Cardinal ... and the tie with tr Pluto now in early Cardinal ... and the early-'70s natal Saturn in early Cardinal,  etc. --Any horoscopic tie with the 12th will put a spotlight on the possiblity of early (40s) prostatic problems.

Noel Tyl
« Last Edit: October 06, 2011, 08:13:05 AM by Noel Tyl » Logged

Noel Tyl
James Williams
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« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2011, 11:52:04 AM »

You're welcome.  I'm more and more convinced that astrologers can do their clients a great service by providing them with these type of internet links, so that they then can have more informative talks with their doctors, spouses, friends, family, etc.
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"The message blazoned across the heavens at the moment of birth is not meant to emphasize fate, but to arouse man's will to escape from his universal thralldom. What he has done he can undo. None other than himself was the instigator of the causes of whatever effects are now prevalent in his life."
Elisabeth Grace
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« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2011, 06:04:02 PM »

Gents:

This just in...fyi...

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/07/health/07prostate.html?_r=1&hp

Rgds,

EG
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James Williams
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« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2011, 06:57:10 PM »

Thank you Elisabeth...I knew this was out there, for it has been going on for some time now...will post something soon that pertains to this article, as pointed out by physician and oftentime Oprah guest, Dr. Larry Dossey in one of his books entitled, Healing Words...
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"The message blazoned across the heavens at the moment of birth is not meant to emphasize fate, but to arouse man's will to escape from his universal thralldom. What he has done he can undo. None other than himself was the instigator of the causes of whatever effects are now prevalent in his life."
James Williams
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« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2011, 05:14:56 AM »

And similarly, I see the following this morning on yahoo...

Panel advises against prostate cancer screening
By LAURAN NEERGAARD - AP Medical Writer | AP – 23 mins ago.

WASHINGTON (AP) — No major medical group recommends routine PSA blood tests to check men for prostate cancer, and now a government panel is saying they do more harm than good and healthy men should no longer receive the tests as part of routine cancer screening.

The panel's guidelines had long advised men over 75 to forgo the tests and the new recommendation extends that do-not-screen advice to healthy men of all ages.

The recommendation by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, being made public on Friday, will not come as a surprise to cancer specialists.

Yet, most men over 50 have had at least one PSA blood test, the assumption being that finding cancer early is always a good thing.

Not so, said Dr. Virginia Moyer of the Baylor College of Medicine, who heads the task force.

"We have put a huge amount of time, effort and energy into PSA screening and that time, effort and energy, that passion, should be going into finding a better test instead of using a test that doesn't work," Moyer told The Associated Press late Thursday.

Too much PSA, or prostate-specific antigen, in the blood only sometimes signals prostate cancer is brewing. It also can mean a benign enlarged prostate or an infection. Worse, screening often detects small tumors that will prove too slow-growing to be deadly. And there's no sure way to tell in advance who needs aggressive therapy.

The task force analyzed all the previous research on this subject, including five major studies, to evaluate whether routine screening reduces deaths from prostate cancer. The conclusion: There's little if any mortality benefit.

But there is harm from routine screening: impotence, incontinence, infections, even death that can come from the biopsies, surgery and radiation, Moyer said.

One study estimated 2 of every 5 men whose prostate cancer was caught through a PSA test had tumors too slow-growing to ever be a threat.

Yet Moyer said 30 percent of men who are treated for PSA-discovered prostate cancer suffer significant side effects, sometimes death, from the resulting treatment.

About a third of men ages 40 to 60 have brewing prostate cancer but "the huge majority of them will never know it in their lifetime if they are not screened," she added.

The task force previously had considered the evidence for or against PSA screening inconclusive. The new recommendation says not to routinely screen. That recommendation is a draft that is open for public comment beginning next week.

"We have been long concerned, and it has been apparent for some years, that some supporters of prostate cancer screening have overstated, exaggerated and in some cases misled men about the evidence supporting its effectiveness," said Dr. Otis Brawley of the American Cancer Society in a statement. "We need balanced, truthful information to be made widely available to physicians and patients when making important health decisions."

The society had not seen the new recommendation yet, but has long advised men to consider the pros and cons of PSA screening before deciding on their own.

Moyer said the recommendation only means that doctors shouldn't bring up the option for healthy men. If a man asks for a PSA test and wants it after being informed of the evidence, he should receive it, she said. Likewise, it's appropriate to use PSA tests to examine a man with possible prostate symptoms.
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"The message blazoned across the heavens at the moment of birth is not meant to emphasize fate, but to arouse man's will to escape from his universal thralldom. What he has done he can undo. None other than himself was the instigator of the causes of whatever effects are now prevalent in his life."
James Williams
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« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2011, 06:23:04 AM »

Best-selling author, Larry Dossey, M.D., wrote the following in his book, "Healing Words"...

"Consider, for example, a woman who discovers a breast lump.  The doctor affirms it on an examination and advises a course of action that eventually includes a mammogram and a biopsy.  Before the tests, no one knows what the 'real' situation is; only possibilities exist.

At this pre-test stage, if we were to take seriously the possibility that we may be able to reach back into the past and affect the unfolding of subatomic events that precede illness, an interesting scenario might unfold.  The patient might take advantage of this window of opportunity and initiate her own prayers, images, and visualizations.  She might marshall her friends to do the same--all in an attempt to affect the critical processes in her body before a cancer might actually develop.  Only after a thorough attempt was made would the process of testing, looking, observing, and interpreting--fixing the event--be allowed to proceed.

Another option would be to do nothing--no exam, no tests, no looking and observing of any sort.  This was the choice of the woman described above who outlived the statistics for breast cancer.  Today, a lot of people would do the same, feeling that medical testing is always wrong.  I disagree.  The fact is that many people, for whatever reason, cannot change their medical past and insure benign outcomes.  That is why medical testing can save lives.

We could apply these precautions before any form of 'medical looking'--whether physical examinations, X rays, mammograms, electrocardiograms, exercise stress tests, sonograms, scans of various sorts, and so on.  Implementing these interventions need not complicate or delay medical evaluations; in all nonurgent situations, these precautions could be taken before the patient even goes to the physician's office or hospital.

This may seem fanciful; but the evidence suggests, as we've seen, that it is possible to reach back into the past and affect the elaboration of subatomic events before they are consciously observed, thus affecting events as they later come to be.  I would suggest that this is at least worth the attempt, especially since no harm would be done in the process."

(1993, pp. 125-126).

Dossey added, "Benevolent, compassionate thoughts may reach back into the past and reshape or prevent events such as a heart attack or a painful, protracted illness.  As C.S. Lewis put it, 'Shocking as it may sound, I conclude that we can at noon become part causes of an event occurring at ten A.M.'  If this sounds like science fiction, we should realize that the possibility is permitted in principle in modern physics, as we have seen" (ibid., p. 129).

Now this is all very interesting.  For example, if Steve Jobs had gone to see an astrologer in October 2003, soon after doctors had discovered a tumor growing in his pancreas during a routine abdominal scan, and the astrologer suggested the course of action described by Dossey, would then Job's biopsy still have revealed the same form of the disease?!  Or any disease at all?!  It would have been very easy for the astrologer at that time to notice transiting Pluto at Jobs' IC and square the Ascendant, along with transiting Uranus conjunct natal Sun (12) and transiting Neptune conjunct natal Mercury (1).  The astrologer would then easily have backtracked to June of 2002 when transiting Saturn was square the Ascendant, conjunct the MC, and opposing transiting Pluto at the IC, and could have suggested to Jobs the treatment plan outlined above by Dossey.  Thus, ten A.M. for Jobs would have been the early summer of 2002, while noon was taking place in October of 2003, to use Lewis' analogy...

Food for thought...
« Last Edit: October 07, 2011, 01:34:55 PM by James Kenneth Williams » Logged

"The message blazoned across the heavens at the moment of birth is not meant to emphasize fate, but to arouse man's will to escape from his universal thralldom. What he has done he can undo. None other than himself was the instigator of the causes of whatever effects are now prevalent in his life."
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