Author Topic: PTSD and Mindfullness  (Read 264 times)

Offline Robynne

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PTSD and Mindfullness
« on: September 09, 2018, 03:04:42 PM »
Hello Forum,


Found this interesting article on when the 'startle response' goes into overdrive.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/unagoraphobic/201410/apply-buddha-brakes-your-startle-reflex-0


Can the practice of meditation and mindfullness be a successful treatment for PTSD, and anxiety disorders?

Any thoughts?
~Only with the heart can you see rightly, what is invisible to the naked eye~

Offline Hudson Valley Astrologer

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Re: PTSD and Mindfullness
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2018, 02:23:10 AM »
Hi Robynne,

"Training the Amydala" sounds like a oxymoron. At the very least you will need a whip and a chair, and maybe a black top hat with a red coat and long tails. The lion tamer never forgets that the lion is wild and so can never really be "trained". Maybe taming the amydala is possible but it will always be connected to the wild.

There is a story of a Tibetan monk high up in the mountains who had achieved the highest levels of enlightenment, being and mindfulness. He was an extremely conscious and aware soul but wasn't always that way. Before he got onto the path his life was a mess both inside and out, but through daily practice he found peace and solitude within himself and within his environment.

One morning he went to the well and took an extra few minutes to wash his hands and rinse his face. It was just before sunrise so few people were up in the village. He was present and fully immersed in the miracle of water. He was contemplating "well being."

Just then a tiger appeared from the forest, but he didn't see it. He didn't hear it growl. He was too busy admiring the well; just being. And the tiger ate him.

HVA

Offline Hudson Valley Astrologer

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Re: PTSD and Mindfullness
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2018, 03:21:50 AM »
... all kidding aside since PTSD is no laughing matter, please check out the article on the other side of this link.

http://www.sydneytms.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Janicak-et-al-Safety-Published-Version.pdf

Meditation comes in and out of favor like the mini skirt and facial hair. I think having a meditation practice can be helpful, but when it comes to PTSD I think we need a bigger gun.  ::) Sorry. Seemed an apt expression.  ;).

I first learned about TMS (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation) reading the bio of a psychiatrist here in the Hudson Valley. He graduated from New York University of Medicine with honors and a host of other accolades. Dr. Randy Pardell is his name and his site is pretty interesting. This approach sounded vaguely familiar to the work Dr. Stephen Larsen has been doing with patients for years. He uses biofeedback technology and actually demonstrated his technique for me when I asked. He has a very eclectic practice, was a devotee of Joseph Campbell and wrote A Fire in the Mind. We had a nice chat when I was there on business learning about his compound. The guy is brilliant. And somebody lit a match to his mind as well, but the place had a 70s EST feel to it, a Werner Ehrhardesque type air about the place and so I never followed up.

But I really thought the biofeedback technology had promise. And now it seems that the technology has evolved into TMS. For PTSD post affects I would try these approaches because of the nature of the condition. For run of the mill apprehension I think we all would be served through a meditation practice. And everything/anything can be a meditation as the article suggests. There is also evidence that the military is making some headway by "training" soldiers before the fact. To better prepare them so that the ravages of war are not so damaging to the mind. They call it "resiliency training" which I think has less to do with training the amydala and more to do with stimulating the prefrontal cortex. That makes sense to me since modern war has nothing to do with avoiding and escaping from wild animals and everything to do with facing man made horrors. Techniques of war continually require an evolved approach to survival, we constantly up the ante, and so I think we need evolved therapies to meet the realities of the threats we face.

I hope you laughed at my little story and hope that this added information adds value to what I think is in truth a very serious topic.

Best,

HVA     

Offline James Williams

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Re: PTSD and Mindfullness
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2018, 06:13:35 AM »
One technique that would help is the self-enquiry technique as taught by Ramana Maharshi, known as Nan Yar, or Who Am I?  It can be googled and downloaded via pdf.
"Time is a trick, a vast illusion...Yet there is a plan behind appearances that does not change. The script is written. For we but see the journey from the point at which it ended, looking back on it, imagining we make it once again; reviewing mentally what has gone by"  (Jesus).

Offline Robynne

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Re: PTSD and Mindfullness
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2018, 10:32:31 AM »
Thanks Tim,

A well thought out response, and yes, did have a laugh at the monks demise. But only because the ending was so unexpected.

So now I'm thinking..was that a Bengal Tiger or White Tiger,  because then future monks could benefit from that lesson.  ;D

Jim, article downloaded. Thank you.   :)

Hopefully others can share as well.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2018, 10:34:39 AM by Robynne »
~Only with the heart can you see rightly, what is invisible to the naked eye~